Update zCash client in Linux

1) Backup your wallet.dat in .zcash folder
cd /.zcash                (go to zcash folder)
ls -la                            (list all hidden files, folder)
cp /.zcash/wallet.dat /home/YOUR-USER-NAME/backup               (copy wallet.dat)

2) Download zcash binary from website:
cd /home/YOUR-USER-NAME/download                   (go to download folder)
wget https://apt.z.cash/pool/main/z/zcash/zcash-2.0.0-amd64.deb               (download file)
( or get newest name of packet at https://apt.z.cash/pool/main/z/zcash/)

3) Stop zcash client and install new package:
zcash-cli stop
sudo dpkg -i /home/YOUR-USER_NAME/download/zcash-2.0.0-amd64.deb

4) Restart zcash client:
zcashd -daemon (for running in background) — or:
zcashd (for running as active app)

5) To check status:
zcash-cli getinfo

Google Hangouts Emoji Keyboard Shortcuts

Google Hangouts emoji keyboard shortcuts…

:C frowning/sad face (U+2639)
🙂 or 🙂 smiley (U+263A)
heart (U+2764)
-<@% honeybee (U+1F41D)
:(|) monkey face (U+1F435)
:(:) pig face (U+1F437)
(Y) or (y) thumb up (U+1F44D)
(N) or (n) thumb down (U+1F44E)
(]:{ man with turban (U+1F473)
</3 or <\\3 broken heart (U+1F494)
~@~ pile of poo (U+1F4A9)
😀 or 😀 grinning face (U+1F600)
^_^ grinning face with closed eyes (U+1F601)
:”D laughing face with tears (U+1F602)
=D laughing face open mouth with happy eyes (U+1F604)
^_^;; laughing face open mouth with tear (U+1F605)
O:) or O=) O:-) angel face (smiley with halo) (U+1F607)
}:) or }=) or }:-) devil face (U+1F608)
😉 or 😉 winking face (U+1F609)
=) blushing smile (U+1F60A)
B-) smiley with sunglasses (U+1F60E)
:, or :-, smirking face (U+1F60F)
😐 or =| or 😐 neutral face (U+1F610)
-_- expressionless face (U+1F611)
o_o; downcast with sweat (U+1F613)
u_u pensive face (U+1F614)
:/ or =/ or =\\ or :\\ or :-/ or :-\\ confused face (U+1F615)
:s or :S or :-s or :-S confounded face (U+1F616)
:* or :-* kissing face (U+1F617)
;* or ;-* face blowing a kiss (U+1F618)
=* blushing kissing face (U+1F61A)
:p or 😛 or =p or =P or :-p or 😛 face with tongue (U+1F61B)
;p or ;P or ;-p or ;-P winking face with tongue (U+1F61C)
😦 or 😦 or =( dissappointed face (U+1F61E)
😡 or >=( or >:-( pouting / angry face (U+1F621)
😥 or ='( or T_T or ;_; crying face (U+1F622)
>.< or >_< persevering face (U+1F623)
D: frowning with open mouth / worried (U+1F626)
:”( loudly crying face (U+1F62D)
😮 or :O or =o or =O or 😮 or :-O or o.o face with open mouth / shocked (U+1F62E)
O.O astonished face / gasping with shock (U+1F632)
X( or X-( or X-o or X-O or x_x dizzy face (U+1F635)
:3 or :X) or =^_^= or (=^..^=) or (=^.^=) grinning cat with smiling eyes (U+1F638)
!:) or !:-) upside-down face (U+1F643)
>:(X person gesturing no / crossed arms (U+1F645)
\o or o/ person raising hand (U+1F64B)
:)X or :-)X or >:D< hugging face / open hands (U+1F917)
\m/ hand horn sign / ‘rock-on’ (U+1F918)
V.v.V crab (U+1F980)

Annoyingly, as you can see in the list, my original search for a keyboard shortcut for the thinking face emoji proved fruitless…
There isn’t one  … yet 

Source: http://www.alanhart.co.uk/archives/2018/01/04/hangouts-emoji-keyboard-shortcuts/

Canon lens date codes and EF lens chronology

Lens manufacturing codes

Some older Canon lenses are stamped with a manufacturing code consisting of two letters and (typically) four numbers.

Before 1986, the code may be in a letter/4 digit/letter format

The first letter indicates the manufacturing site:
U = Utsunomiya, F = Fukushima, O = Oita

The second letter is the year the lens was made

A = 2012, 1986, 1960 B = 2013, 1987, 1961 C = 2014, 1988, 1962 D = 2015, 1989, 1963 E = 2016, 1990, 1964 F = 1991, 1965
G = 1992, 1966 H = 1993, 1967 I = 1994, 1968 J = 1995, 1969 K = 1996, 1970 L = 1997, 1971
M = 1998, 1972 N = 1999, 1973 O = 2000, 1974 P = 2001, 1975 Q = 2002, 1976 R = 2003, 1977
S = 2004, 1978 T = 2005, 1979 U = 2006, 1980 V = 2007, 1981 W = 2008, 1982 X = 2009, 1983
Y = 2010, 1984 Z = 2011, 1985

So the UC1204 Canon Date code would indicate a lens made at Utsunomiya in December 1988

 

The date codes restarted at ‘A’ again in 2012. This TS-E24 mk2 lens ‘UD0406’ was purchased in 2015 (box dated May 2015)

It seems that the old date code system is still in use – a TS-E17 UC0903 (Sept. 2014) is consistent with the box date (Oct. 2014)

lens date code

[Thanks Ciriaco for the update]

The 3rd and 4th digits are an internal Canon manufacturing code. Starting in 1990, Canon only date coded some specific lenses

All L-series lenses EF15mm f/2.8 Fisheye EF24mm f/2.8 EF28mm f/2.8 EF28-70mm f/3.5-4.5
EF28-70mm f/3.5-4.5 II EF35mm f/2 EF35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 EF35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 EF35-105mm f/3.5-4.5
EF35-135mm f/3.5-4.5 EF50-200mm f/3.5-4.5 EF50mm f/1.8 EF50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro EF70-210mm f/4
EF100-200mm f/4.5 EF100-300mm f/5.6 EF135mm f/2.8 Soft Focus MP-E65 f/2.8 Macro TS-E45mm f/2.8
TS-E90mm f/2.8

A newer lens date code

Note that the codes have become less common on recent lenses, with serial numbers in a different ‘xx y zzzzzzz’ format.

This is indicated on this EF8-15 f/4L fisheye zoom 7900001555

Canon ef8-15 lens showing manufacturing code and serial number

The first two digits are a date code, indicating month and year of manufacture.

In this case ’79’ equates with June 2011′

The next number ‘0’ is believed to be a batch or manufacturing revision number (it has been used in the service/recall process)

The remaining seven digits ‘0001555’ are a basic serial number (this was a very early lens – one of the first shipped in the UK)

How to interpret the date code? It’s been suggested that the code starts in January 2008 with the number 38 and increments each month of the year.

We believe the code was reset to 01 for Jan 2013 – but this is still not known for certain. The figures here should be taken as a guide. If you find a change in codes, please do let us know and we’ll see what we can add to this info.

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2008 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49
2009 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61
2010 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73
2011 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 83 85
2012 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97
2013 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12
2014 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
2015 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36
2016 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
2017 49 50 51 52 53 54 55

The code seems to work for modern ‘L’ lenses, but take this example of an EF50/1.4

Canon EF50 f/1.4 lens showing manufacturing date codes

The lens was purchased in March 2012, so the code ’83’ for October 2011 is reasonable. The digit ‘5’ for a revision code is also reasonable for a lens that’s been around for a few years (1993), but we are left with a 5 digit serial number.

The ‘revision’ code is not certain, with a 2014 50/1.4 starting 17080xxx – OK for 17 (May 14), but ‘0’ for the rev code?

…Thanks to a reader for sending this in – if you have any more examples, please do let us know?

So, a way of identifying dates, but not quite so clear as the old letter codes.

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Raya Pro – HDR Blending Add-in for Photoshop

“Raya Pro: A MUST HAVE PANEL. Raya Pro is one of the finest panels I have used. It makes digital blending extremely easy – just a click of a button and the blending is done. There are a few great new options I can’t wait to apply in my blending. Thanks to Jimmy for this amazing tool” – By Rustam Azmi

2017/10: latest version is Raya Pro 2.0 (Version 3.0 is coming)

Introductory video about Raya Pro 2.0

 

Source: http://www.shutterevolve.com/raya-pro-the-ultimate-digital-blending-workflow-panel-for-photoshop/

Understanding AF Detection at f/8 on DSLR Cameras

Misunderstanding 1: The inability to focus at small apertures is nothing to do with amount of light. You still have a lot of light with f/8 in sunny day, much more than at f/2.8 indoors. It is actually related to Phase Detection AF mechanism which operates much like range finder comparing images from different angles to determine it’s in-focus or not. Small lens aperture just blocks light paths from different angles, and as the result, makes AF sensor unable to work reliably or not at all.

Misunderstanding 2: Older Nikon cameras may not auto-focus reliably with a lens having a maximum aperture smaller than f/5.6. That may sound bad, if you assume that it means the camera will not auto-focus reliably when the aperture is closed down to f/5.6. That is not what Nikon is saying! Instead they are telling us that auto-focus may not work reliably on older Nikon cameras with a lens having a maximum aperture of f/5.6, with the emphasis on the word maximum.

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