Category Archives: Technology

Manually Create a Bootable UEFI 64-bit USB Flash Drive (Windows 7, 8, 2008, 2012)

  1. Create bootable USB:
    • Open CMD (with runas administrator), and use the following command to create bootable USB:
      • diskpart
      • list disk  (to verify which disk is the USB)
      • select disk # (select the USB disk)
      • clean
      • create partition primary
      • format fs=fat32 quick
      • active
      • assign
      • exit
    • Copy all file from Installation CD/DVD to the USB. It should be already bootable for 32-bit.
  2. Make UEFI (64 bit) bootable:
    • On the USB flash drive, “copy” the efi\microsoft\boot folder up one level into the efi folder as efi\boot.
    • Use 7-zip to Open sources\install.wim on the USB flash drive,
      • Go to: \1\Windows\Boot\EFI\bootmgfw.efi
      • Copy bootmgfw.efi to somewhere (e.g. desktop), then close 7-zip
      • Rename the bootmgfw.efi into bootx64.efi.
      • Copy/Move the renamed bootx64.efi file into the efi/boot folder on the USB flash drive

Using Lightning-to-USB-Adapter to copy photo from USB drive to iPhone/iPad

03-apple-lightning-to-usb-camera-adapter

Using Lightning-To-USB Adapter to copy images from USB Flash Drive to iPhone/iPad:

  • Requirement:
    • All image files need to put in a folder name: DCIM
    • Image files must have a filename with exactly 8 characters long (no spaces) plus the file extension (i.e., my-movie.mov; DSCN0164.jpg).
  • How to copy file:
    • If connected iPhone/iPad sees the flash drive, it’ll open all photos in thumbnails. You cannot view more than thumbnails off the drive. To see them bigger, you must import them.
    • Select to import few photo or import all photos.
    • Once you import, pay attention to the dialogue boxes because it’ll offer to delete the photos from the flash drive for you.
    • (You can not export photo from iPhone to flash drive).

 

Sony RX100 Series Comparison (I, II, III, IV and V)

Articles from: https://photographylife.com/sony-rx100-series-comparison

Specification Sony RX100 I Sony RX100 II Sony RX100 III Sony RX100 IV Sony RX100 V
As expected, the latest generation Sony RX100 V obviously does have much richer feature-set and specifications compared to its predecessors. It has a superior Stacked CMOS sensor with excellent image quality that surpasses all the previous generation RX100 cameras, faster Bionz X processor with a front-end LSI capable of handling up to 24 fps shooting speed, 315 phase-detection autofocus points, 4K video recording at up to 30 fps and very respectable slow motion video recording capability up to 960 fps. It can handle shutter speeds of up to 1/32000 sec, has a very nice 2.36M electronic viewfinder (EVF), incredibly fast autofocus and a few other nice extras, such as anti distortion shutter and ability to set minimum shutter speed when shooting with Auto ISO enabled.
Announcement Date 06/06/2012 06/27/2013 05/28/2014 06/10/2015 10/06/2016
Sensor Type CMOS BSI CMOS BSI CMOS Stacked CMOS Stacked CMOS
Sensor Resolution 20.2 MP 20.2 MP 20.1 MP 20.1 MP 20.1 MP
Sensor Size 13.2 x 8.8mm (1″) 13.2 x 8.8mm (1″) 13.2 x 8.8mm (1″) 13.2 x 8.8mm (1″) 13.2 x 8.8mm (1″)
Native ISO Range 125-6400 160-12,800 125-12,800 125-12,800 125-12,800
Image Processor Bionz Bionz Bionz X Bionz X Bionz X
Phase Detection Autofocus No No No No Yes
Phase Detection Autofocus Points N/A N/A N/A N/A 315 AF Points
Lens Focal Length 10.4-37.1mm 10.4-37.1mm 8.8-25.7mm 8.8-25.7mm 8.8-25.7mm
Focal Length in 35mm Equiv 28-100mm 28-100mm 24-70mm 24-70mm 24-70mm
Lens Aperture f/1.8-f/4.9 f/1.8-f/4.9 f/1.8-f/2.8 f/1.8-f/2.8 f/1.8-f/2.8
Integrated ND Filter No No Yes Yes Yes
Maximum Shutter Speed 1/2000 sec 1/2000 sec 1/2000 sec 1/32000 sec 1/32000 sec
Startup Time 2.8 sec 2.8 sec 2.0 sec 2.0 sec 2.0 sec
Anti Distortion Shutter No No No Yes Yes
Auto ISO Min Shutter Speed No No No Yes Yes
EVF N/A Optional 1.44 Million Dot EVF 2.36 Million Dot EVF 2.36 Million Dot EVF
Flash Hotshoe No Yes No No No
Built-in Flash Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Continuous Shooting Speed 10 fps 10 fps 10 fps 16 fps 24 fps
Buffer Size 13 JPEG / 13 RAW 13 JPEG / 13 RAW 48 JPEG / 26 RAW 48 JPEG / 26 RAW 150 JPEG + RAW
LCD Screen 3.0″ Fixed 3.0″ Tilting, +90°/-40° 3.0″ Tilting, +180°/-45° 3.0″ Tilting, +180°/-45° 3.0″ Tilting, +180°/-45°
Video Recording 1080p, up to 50 fps 1080p, up to 60 fps 1080p, up to 60 fps 4K, up to 30 fps 4K, up to 30 fps
S-Log2/S-Gamut No No No No Yes
Slow Motion Video N/A N/A Yes, Up to 120 fps Yes, Up to 960 fps Yes, Up to 960 fps
Slow Motion Video Duration N/A N/A 29 min 4 sec 8 sec
Built-in WiFi No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Battery Life (CIPA) 330 shots 350 shots 320 shots 280 shots 220 shots
Weight 240g 281g 290g 298g 299g
Size 102×58×36mm 102×58×38mm 102×58×41mm 102x58x41mm 102x58x41mm
Current Price (as of 10/06/2016) $448 $598 $748 $998 $998

Install Mac OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) and xCode on VirtualBox

 

  • VirtualBox: https://www.virtualbox.org/
  • Download Mac OS X El Capitan 10.11 via torrent
  • Download xCode from AppStore (inside virtual Mac OS)
  • GPX File editor: Adze Lite (for Mac OS) (download from AppStore)

 

 

 

How to get rid of the “Your upgrade to Windows 10 is ready” lock

Did you sign up for the Windows 10 upgrade, but change your mind? This may fix your Win7/8.1 updater

You signed up for the Windows 10 upgrade, but now that the bits are ready, you’re getting cold feet. I understand. But there’s one little problem: Your Windows 7 or 8.1 machine won’t install any updates until you install Windows 10. Windows Update may say, “Your upgrade to Windows 10 is ready,” and if you check for updates, you get “Windows Update cannot currently check for updates, because you must first restart the computer so that a previous installation can be completed.”

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